Tips for Brands Looking for Wine Importers and Distributors in USA

At the Conference Sessions for USATT, held at the Metropolitan Pavilion in March 2016, there was a Panel that comprised of Jim Ryan, SVP of the beer division of Constellation Brands, Giacomo Turone, VP of wine and spirits importer Palm Bay International and Scott Ades, CEO of The Winebow Group. They were asked questions relevant to the attenting audience comprising of retailers, producers, importers and distributors of alcoholic beverages.

In this video Producers get solid tips for brands looking for wine importers and distributors in USA Please read below, one of the questions that was put forth to the panel and their answers.[ Also check out this webinar on How to Presenting your Brands to Wine Importers in USA ]

The Best Way to Pitch a Wine Importer or Distributor

If you’re looking to get your wines or spirits on the shelves of retail stores, you’ll have to know the best way to pitch a wine importer and distributor. You can think of them as the gatekeepers to getting your product on shelves. While they are obviously looking for products that are going to be profitable for them, they also want to hear the stories, expectations, and goals behind your wine.

As Scott Ades, CEO of The Winebow Group, explained, he gets a lot of calls and requests from people who would like to have their wines distributed. Sometimes, in fact, they simply ship bottles directly to him, hopeful that the most direct path is also the best path. But as Ades pointed out, he’s really looking for the “story” behind the wine and the winery. A good storytelling narrative can help to get his attention.

Of course, the situation is different if a wine is already established. In that case, the story may not matter as much as the actual facts about how the wine is already performing. But that’s seldom the case – instead, young unproven products must rely on a host of other factors – including early press coverage, overall competitive position, and pricing to cut through all the clutter.

Often, says Ades, if a wine is in a growing segment that’s not crowded yet, that can make a big difference in getting noticed. Giacomo Turone, a VP with the wine and spirits importer Palm Bay International, agrees. For him, being in a “hot category” is key. He’s looking at products from an overall portfolio perspective, and he’s always looking for emerging categories that are prepared for significant future growth.

To get a sense of where a wine is headed, he’ll take the time to talk to the people behind the brand. Data is important, but the personal characteristics are also important. If the wine is from overseas, he’ll want to see how the wine has performed in that foreign market first. He’ll also try to see if the wine is “press worthy” in terms of being a wine that he can present to the U.S. media. Is there a story already in place, or will he have to work with the wine to develop that whole storytelling narrative?

Finally, Jim Ryan, a SVP with the beer division of Constellation Brands, agrees that a wine doesn’t have to have “big growth” immediately. He tends to think in terms of 3-to-5-year time horizons. For him, the most attractive products to import are ones that are at the high-end, premium segment of the market, since that’s where the most growth is happening right now.

When he’s making the decision about a product, he’s thinking in terms of an entire portfolio. A wine or spirit brand should either complement the entire portfolio, or fill a void (what Ryan refers to as “white space”). As a final consideration, he’ll think about factors like ease of execution (i.e. how easy it is to import) and total investment required.

Ultimately, it all comes down to a single question: Why should a distributor be stocking your product and not somebody else’s? Having a story in place that lays out the expectations and goals of your product, and that helps to position your product as part of a broader portfolio of a wine distributor, can make all the difference.

Here the answer to this question at 3:25 minutes

Join the USATT 17 Conference. Meet state Importers and Distributors, Retailers and Press of USA in New York City to Grow Your Distribution.

Event Producer: Beverage Trade Network

USA Trade Tasting is brought to you by Beverage Trade Network, the leading online platform dedicated to connecting the global beverage industry. Beverage Trade Network (BTN) successfully connects wineries, breweries, distilleries and brand owners with international importers, distributors, brokers and beverage industry professionals on a daily basis. Strong partnerships with international and US organizations have helped BTN establish USA Trade Tasting as a premiere sales and marketing event committed to connecting the beverage industry.

2018 Exhibitor Super Early Bird Registration Is Now Open. Secure Your Best Price Now And Grow In Us Market.

How has the Brand Agency Dynamic in the US Market Changed?

At the Conference Sessions for USATT, held at the Metropolitan Pavilion in March 2016, there was a Panel that comprised of Jim Ryan, SVP of the beer division of Constellation Brands, Giacomo Turone, VP of wine and spirits importer Palm Bay International and Scott Ades, CEO of The Winebow Group. They were asked questions relevant to the attending audience comprising of distributors, importers, retailers and producers of alcoholic beverages.

Please read below, one of the questions that was put forth to the panel and their answers.

 What You Need to Know About the Changing Agency Dynamic in the US Wine Market

If you’re looking to break into the hyper-competitive U.S. wine and spirits market, you have two basic alternatives – you can either be an “owned brand” or you can be an “agency brand.” While in the past, it might have been more common to start off as an “agency brand,” that dynamic has been changing over the past five years in response to competitive market conditions.

For smaller wine brands, of course, it makes sense to be an agency brand. That means that the importer or distributor will act on your behalf as your agent, taking over the costs of marketing and distributing your wine. At some point, though, once you’ve hit a certain level of growth, it’s more efficient to be an owned brand. That’s because even the biggest importers simply don’t have the resources to give each brand the amount of time they need.

As Jim Ryan, SVP of the beer division of Constellation Brands, pointed out during a panel discussion at the USATT Conference 2016, the way that Corona started out in the US market was actually as an agency brand. However, for Constellation, the goal was to grow the brand faster than the entire imported beer segment, and the only way to do that was to acquire the Corona Extra and Corona Light brands from Grupo Modelo.

That meant that Constellation could put its full marketing muscle behind the brand, and really help it to become an even more successful brand. From Constellation’s perspective, it’s not just about gathering together a lot of different brands within a portfolio, it’s about focusing on core brands that can be more successful than the overall market.

Giacomo Turone, VP of wine and spirits importer Palm Bay International, says that the decision of whether to work with“agency brands” or “owned brands” is really about “filling voids.” If there’s a market niche to be filled, it might make sense to set up an agency relationship, but sometimes partners don’t have the right brands to fill a niche. At some point, he says, it’s about “defining our own destiny.” And the only way that’s going to happen is if you develop a long-term partnership and really invest in the future of the brand. When you’re an owned brand, there’s more at stake for the company.

However, in order to be an owned brand means that you are big enough to bear all the expenses. Scott Ades, CEO of The Winebow Group, illustrates this point with the Italian wine brand Santa Margherita, which started off as an agency brand. It was simply too small and unknown to handle everything by itself. But over time, the wine built up its brand and now has the scale to represent itself. Santa Margherita USA is a now fine wine import company representing premium wine estates from Italy. So, again, it’s really a matter of scale. Once you hit a certain size and scale, the dynamic between “agency brand” and “owned brand” shifts.

Turone notes that “a large importer can be a good fit for anyone.” But the importer and supplier must understand each other. Wine suppliers have to understand that a little brand is not going to get a lot of time, so even if there’s a big wine importer ready to take it on, that doesn’t guarantee future success.

The bottom line is that any relationship needs to make sense financially. The question ultimately comes down to this: “Your grandfather makes a wonderful wine, but how do we make money from it?” A wholesaler isn’t going to build the brand. That burden is going to fall on the importer and the supplier partner. It’s the importer and supplier, working together, which must build the brand.

Watch the entire panel discussion session:

Join the USATT 17 Conference. Meet Importers, State Distributors, Retailers and Press of USA in New York City to Grow Your Distribution.

Event Producer: Beverage Trade Network

USA Trade Tasting is brought to you by Beverage Trade Network, the leading online platform dedicated to connecting the global beverage industry. Beverage Trade Network (BTN) successfully connects wineries, breweries, distilleries and brand owners with international importers, distributors, brokers and beverage industry professionals on a daily basis. Strong partnerships with international and US organizations have helped BTN establish USA Trade Tasting as a premiere sales and marketing event committed to connecting the beverage industry.

2018 Exhibitor Super Early Bird Registration Is Now Open. Secure Your Best Price Now And Grow In Us Market.

Cocktail Bars in New York

Here are some cocktail bars to visit in New York while you are at USATT

Clover Club

Cocktail Bars

Clover Club is a premiere cocktail bar in Brooklyn. Clover Club means exquisite cocktails, real food and an atmosphere of true hospitality. The original Clover Club was a select group of Philadelphia journalists who, from 1882 until the 1920’s met once a month at the Bellevue Hotel to drink and eat and talk. Here at the new Clover Club, they’ve been striving to follow in those old-time Philadelphians’ footsteps since they opened back in 2008. They want you to drink and eat and, above all, talk, and they do their best to provide a place where you can enjoy such things to their fullest.

Maison Premiere

Cocktail Bars

Maison Premiere, an Oyster House and Cocktail Den reflective of the staple establishments of New York, Paris and New Orleans. Inspired by hotel lobbies of days gone by, afternoons in Paris cafes, late night dinners brooding over bivalves and wading through glasses of pastis and absinthe, they bring to their guests a list of oysters from 30 different varieties based on market availability. Their Absinthe list boasts the largest collection of premium Absinthes in New York City and in honor of the ceremony and traditions of Absinthe, Maison Premiere’s ode to the green fairy can be found center stage dispensing chilled water in the form of the world’s most accurate working replica of the Absinthe fountain which once flowed in the Olde Absinthe House of New Orleans.

Employees Only

Cocktail Bars

In 2004, Dushan, Henry, Igor, Jay and Billy set out together to create a local bar with a focus on elevating the craft of the cocktail. Their hard work and creativity resulted in a new experience where one could enjoy the best drinks and delicious food, all served in a beautiful space without pretense. Twelve years later, their vision remains intact. Employees Only has been one of New York’s most popular cocktail bars since it opened in the West Village in 2004. Employees Only is located at 510 Hudson Street between 10th and Christopher Streets in the West Village.

The Up & Up Bar

Cocktail Bars

The Up & Up is a craft cocktail bar in Manhattan’s Greenwich Village.  Follow the illuminated arrow pointing down the stairs leading from MacDougal Street into a historic space, once home to the Gaslight Cafe, the birthplace of the Beat Generation and venue for some of the most storied musical acts. Here, nestled among the William Morris wallpaper, marble, brass, and wood, you will find a new kind of neighborhood cocktail bar, One where hospitality and skill work in concert.  Guided by the mantra, high-end, low-key, the Up & Up is the perfect marriage of an intimate cocktail den and a social, comfortable, neighborhood bar.

The Summit Bar

Cocktail Bars

The Summit Bar was opened in 2009 by owners Greg Seider & Hamid Rashidzada. They first thought of opening a hand-crafted cocktail bar when they were working together at The Mercer Kitchen. While bartending at The Mercer, Seider used the extensive ingredients available from their kitchen as a source of fresh seasonal herbs and global spices to create his original style. With an extensive collection of newly designed cocktails that Seider created over the years. Seider & Hamid decided to open their venture in the Alphabet City area of the East Village. In The Summit Bar’s first year of opening it was graciously awarded “Most Democratic Cocktail Bar” by Time Out Magazine and “Best Cocktail Bar of New York 2010” by New York Magazine.

Bemelmans Bar  

Cocktail Bars

Named in honor of Ludwig Bemelmans, the creator of the classic Madeline children’s books, Bemelmans Bar is a timeless location that continues to attract socialites, politicians, movie stars and moguls with its extensive drink menu and nightly live entertainment. The bar maintains its Art Deco legacy with chocolate-brown leather banquettes, nickel-trimmed black glass tabletops, a dramatic black granite bar and a 24-karat gold leaf-covered ceiling. Guests are charmed by its distinct New York style and the large-scale murals in the hotel bar, the only surviving Bemelmans Bar open to the public.

Death & Company

Cocktail Bars

Opened on New Year’s Eve 2006/07 in Manhattan’s East Village, Death & Co quickly became a cocktail institution, owed greatly to its staff of incredible bartenders. In 2010, Death & Co won Best American Cocktail Bar and World’s Best Cocktail Menu at Tales of the Cocktail Spirited awards. Death & Co continues to receive worldwide recognition as a cocktail industry leader. The Death & Co book is the definitive guide to the contemporary craft cocktail movement, from one of the world’s most influential and lauded bars. Featuring hundreds of recipes for original creations as well as classic drink cocktails, Death & Co is not only a comprehensive collection of the bar’s best—it’s also a complete cocktail education.

Analogue

Cocktail Bars

Analogue is a cocktail bar located in the heart of Greenwich Village.  Its name references both the records played over a vintage Hi-Fi setup and the idea that it offers an escape from the digital world in which we live.  It is a place where people can enjoy and hear a conversation and have a great drink in a relaxed and friendly environment.  Analogue features a cocktail-driven menu, along with an extensive lineup of scotches and bourbons, craft beer and a concise list of great wines. Analogue features live music on a weekly basis, with bands coming in from all over New York City and beyond. It offers an alternative approach to traditional jazz clubs, with no cover charge or assigned seating.

Bar Goto

Cocktail Bars

BAR GOTO specializes in craft cocktails and comfort Japanese bar food. A thoughtful selection of Wine, Champagne, Beer and Sake is also available. It is located at the Lower East Side. It opened by Kanta Goto. The Bar Goto is known for its Sakura Martini (sake, gin, maraschino liqueur, cherry blossom), but also serves Japanese appetizers, such as Kombu celery, Japanese cabbage pancakes, and miso chicken wings.

Mother of Pearl

Cocktail Bars

Mother of Pearl is a post modern Polynesian restaurant and cocktail bar. Mother of Pearl is serving sophisticated tiki cocktails & Hawaiian-inspired plates in a chic setting with island flair. Mother of Pearl is located in the former Gin Palace spot. Mother of Pearl is run by Jane Danger and Ravi DeRossi.

 

Meet importers, Distributors and Press from the US who re looking to expand their  business year.

Event Producer: Beverage Trade Network

USA Trade Tasting is brought to you by Beverage Trade Network, the leading online platform dedicated to connecting the global beverage industry. Beverage Trade Network (BTN) successfully connects wineries, breweries, distilleries and brand owners with international importers, distributors, brokers and beverage industry professionals on a daily basis. Strong partnerships with international and US organizations have helped BTN establish USA Trade Tasting as a premiere sales and marketing event committed to connecting the beverage industry.

2018 Exhibitor Super Early Bird Registration Is Now Open. Secure Your Best Price Now And Grow In Us Market.

 

Want to Succeed in the U.S. Wine Market? Here’s the Secret

U.S. wine marketWinemaking is a competitive industry. That competition increases to a fever pitch once winemakers move beyond the country’s borders and enter the global market. One of the most sought-after settings in the world marketplace is the U.S. With winemakers from so many countries competing for attention and marketshare, it can be a real challenge to even get your product on store shelves in the U.S. Wine market, let alone achieve success there.
What exactly are U.S. wine retailers looking for when they choose new brands? When you’ve got one make-it-or-break-it shot to convince them to give you that shelf space instead of your competitors, what will make your product stand out from the rest?

It seems that the secret is twofold. You must present your wine as something unique from all the others. It’s also important to educate yourself about the kind of store you’re pitching and focus on what’s important to them.

Standing Out from the Crowd
Ben von Doussa, USA Market Entry Manager for Wine Australia, reminds winemakers that retailers and wholesalers deal with a huge number of things on a daily basis. In addition to the day-to-day task of running a store and working with customers, they are inundated with messages and sales pitches from various brands. This includes a large number of Aussie wine offerings from different companies. If yours doesn’t strike them as something unique, it will get lost in the sea of competitors.

To give you an idea of the kind of numbers that are involved here, the Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau (TTB) approves approximately 180,000 to 220,000 SKU’s annually. This would translate to a distributor or retailer being pitched anywhere from 1500 to 2000 products within a space of a few weeks. A huge number of brands are constantly trying to attract attention and secure precious shelf space.

In the U.S. market, authenticity is the key to standing out. The most sought-after wine retailers want brands that have a story behind them. They want to present a wine brand that conveys a sense of pride in its product. So for example in order to achieve Wine Australia’s goal of making Australia “the world’s pre-eminent wine-producing country,”winemakers have to focus on the specifics that make fine wines from Australia truly special.

Provenance is part of this story. Australia is a country of terroirs that are unlike any others in the world, with growing conditions that are both diverse and unique. Details truly matter, from the water to the soil conditions and the geography. The region, growing environment and the appellation all tell the story that retailers need to hear.

U.S. retailers want to be able to convey this to their customers—consumers who want luxury wine that’s authentic and tied to the place and people who brought it about. New wine offerings can help revitalize the category from the virtual brands that have hurt the image of Australian wine in the eyes of many retailers and consumers. This will also help with the presentation of fine Australian wines as a luxury product that can deliver the margin that wines from other parts of the world deliver, as many Australian wines are sold as low-cost, entry-level offerings.

Know the Customer
Knowing how each retailer works and how their customers behave is also an important aspect of making your pitch. Costco is a sought-after warehouse club that can move a huge amount of product without a concern for price point. Its customers tend to purchase wine based on reviews and ratings. Meanwhile, clubs such as BJ’s and Sam’s operate differently, offering cost-effective options to customers who are primarily motivated by price point. These customers aren’t concerned with the story behind the wine.

Grocery stores with specialty wine programs such as Earth Fare and Wegman’s should be an important area of focus for wine brands. These are the stores where you can really build your brand by presenting your story. The customers that shop here love wine with a good story and an attractive package; they also spend lots of time researching online ratings.

While grocery chains can prove to be a tough nut to crack, they shouldn’t be completely ignored. If you can get your brand into a grocery store such as Kroger or Publix at a luxury price point, there is a huge potential to move a large amount of product. Grocery stores want quality wine and are happy to provide a selection for their customers who are looking for a higher price point. However, the current selection of Aussie wines being presented at most grocery stores are being sold as entry-level wines.

The drug store market in the U.S. is not a prime wine market and isn’t a worthwhile use of energy for winemakers who are marketing a premium product. American drug stores contain the lowest-priced wines and have customers who are primarily motivated by a wine’s price point and packaging rather than the quality.
A great place to focus energy and attention is with independent wine retailers in the U.S. Fine wine stores such as Sherry Lehman and Binny’sin Chicago provide a market where price point is not an issue at all. These kinds of retailers sell to a customer base that is focused on ratings, as well as your story. They want to know where their wine is from, how it was made and what makes it different from the brand sitting directly next to it on the shelf.

As years go by, more and more of the wine market is playing out on the internet. Sites such as Wine.com and WTSO cater to customers who really do their research. Ratings play heavily with these customers, but they also want to know the story behind any brand they consider. Price point doesn’t play heavily into choices made by online wine purchasers.
Wine and liquor chains with multiple locations such as ABC or Apple Jack function similarly to specialty grocery stores. They market wine by placing a spotlight on ratings and the story. Attractive packaging also works to garner the attention of customers in these stores. Small mum and pop stores sell their product to customers who are primarily concerned with ratings and packaging. Although price point isn’t so much of an issue here, it’s a tough road to success via mum and pop stores, as they don’t sell a high volume of product. This means you will put in a lot of work to sell a low number of cases.

Success in the U.S. wine market truly comes down to doing your homework. You must have a unique, compelling story prepared—one that makes the retailer and the customer feel a connection with your wine and your brand. In addition to this, you must walk into each store knowing what aspect of wine purchasing is important to their customer. In your sales pitch, you must sell to that perspective. Keeping these things in mind will greatly up your chances of edging out the competition in such a teeming and ever-changing market.

Meet Importers, State Distributors, Retailers and Press of USA in New York City and Grow Your Distribution.

Event Producer: Beverage Trade Network

USA Trade Tasting is brought to you by Beverage Trade Network, the leading online platform dedicated to connecting the global beverage industry. Beverage Trade Network (BTN) successfully connects wineries, breweries, distilleries and brand owners with international importers, distributors, brokers and beverage industry professionals on a daily basis. Strong partnerships with international and US organizations have helped BTN establish USA Trade Tasting as a premiere sales and marketing event committed to connecting the beverage industry.

2018 Exhibitor Super Early Bird Registration Is Now Open. Secure Your Best Price Now And Grow In Us Market.

 

Discover Light & Refreshing Wines from Beaujolais Region at USATT

The vineyards of Beaujolais region stretch from north to south across 55km of hillsides,bordered to the west by the foothills of the Massif Central and to the east by the Saone river plain. Situated a stone’s throw from Lyon, less than 30 minutes by car, this region’s past as well as its future are closely bound to that of this gastronomic capital, giving it a particular stature.Sometimes called the vineyard of Lyon or Lyon’s ‘third river’, if only one word had to be chosen to resume the Beaujolais it would without any doubt be ‘diversity’.

The region has ideal growing conditions. It receives lots of sunshine and has granite-based soils that lend excellent structure to the wines. The Gamay grape is used to make all Beaujolais wines with the exception of white Beaujolais, or Beaujolais blanc, which is made of Chardonnay grapes.

Total surface area of vine growing area: 67 square miles

Grape Variety: Gamay Noir à Jus Blanc (99 percent of production)

Annual production: 850,000 hl

Number of appellations: 12, including 10 Crus

1. Brouilly
2. Chénas
3. Chiroubles
4. Côte de Brouilly
5. Fleurie
6. Juliénas
7. Morgon
8. Moulin-à-Vent
9. Régnié
10. Saint-Amour
11. Beaujolais
12. Beaujolais Villages

Number of winegrowers: 2,600

Average surface area of an estate: .03 square miles

Yield authorized per appellation: 13,000 hl per square mile

The French wines of the Beaujolais region are made from handpicked Gamay grapes. The region is best known for its light red wines, which taste great chilled and offer a refreshing flavor profile.

beaujolais region

Discover more about the Beaujolais wine region at USA Trade Tasting 2017.

 

 

Event Producer: Beverage Trade Network

USA Trade Tasting is brought to you by Beverage Trade Network, the leading online platform dedicated to connecting the global beverage industry. Beverage Trade Network (BTN) successfully connects wineries, breweries, distilleries and brand owners with international importers, distributors, brokers and beverage industry professionals on a daily basis. Strong partnerships with international and US organizations have helped BTN establish USA Trade Tasting as a premiere sales and marketing event committed to connecting the beverage industry.

2018 Exhibitor Super Early Bird Registration Is Now Open. Secure Your Best Price Now And Grow In Us Market.

 

9 Tips to Write a Profitable Wine List for your Restaurant

Wine list

The wine list is the ultimate business card for restaurants. To create a functional and profitable one is not a simple task even for an experienced sommelier. Here are some 9 tips to consider when curating a wine list that will increase profits for your restaurant.

1. Understand your target audience.
Evaluate your target audience according to the proposed menu (quality standards, sophistication and prices). The ambience of the restaurant will relate directly to the wine menu. A casual dining space would call for easy drinking wines and the prices would go hand-in-hand with the dining fare. An Italian restaurant without Prosecco and Chianti does not complete the menu.
The location of the restaurant also plays a key role. A restaurant or a wine bar situated in the center of a metropolis can afford greater ease in choosing the wines to be put in the list, thanks to tourism from around the world.

A restaurant that is “off the beaten track”, with a loyal customer base, will focus on the exclusivity of its menu, the originality of their proposals and a carefulselection of wines from across the country and around the world. Ensuring both a selection of “always present” wines, which allow you to build customer loyalty, and the introduction of new itemsfrom time-to-time will allow your restaurant to please your patrons’ palate.
A great strategy is to involve your customers in selecting next month’s “new release” by asking them to vote from a proposal of wines. Customers will feel like a part of your restaurant’s framework and be curious to know if the wine that they voted for made next month’s release. They could choose to provide their contact details and be informed of the results of the vote, making their affiliation with your restaurant more personal.

2. Meet, know and taste the wine
Taste the wines you would like to include in your wine list together with the team of your restaurant and note each team member’s feedback. Also try to organize a wine tasting with your restaurant’s distributors, sales agents, and, if possible, the producers themselves, on a day that the restaurant is closed for business. Focus not only on the sensory evaluation of the wine, but on a deeper knowledge of the story behind each production. Stories that will be very useful in proposing a label to customers. If you are not well-versed in the field, get assistance from partners, employees, sommeliers or a wine expert.

3.Don’t forget local wine
There isn’t a sadder thing than to be in a restaurant with typical local cuisine but missing wines from the local area. Taste wines from the wineriesin your vicinity or a neighboring wine-growing state and keep a selection of these on yourwine list. They will complement the carte du jour andas you have chosen to serve local cuisine at your restaurant, the target audience would also love to try the indigenous wines.
By supporting wineries in your area, you in turn will build a network in the community and wineries may recommend your restaurant to their customers.

4.Seasonality of the menu
Besides a fixed wine list, you can have a variable wine list that changes with the seasonality of the fare. People routinely make a shift towards whites in the summer months and reds in the cooler months so change your selection accordingly. Ciders become popular in Fall so having a few of these in this season will sit well with your customers. Align your menu with different times of the year; for example, market a wine as the Harvest Special for a month.

5.It’s all about the right order in the list
An ascending order of price is an enticingly easy route to take, but it is not always the most appropriate, since a novice wine-drinker will always stop at the first proposals.Grouping wines by type, region and vintage (for example: separate new world wines from the old world) would give a chance to the customer to acquaint themselves with the wine menu, without being influenced too much by the price.

6.Be concise, selective but inclusive.
Regardless of the level of your restaurant, unless you’re renowned for a high-level cellar, don’t abuse your customer’s patience by creating excessively heavy and long wine lists. Not only will this cause inventory issues for your restaurant, but a carefully curated list will be much appreciated by your customers.
It will be easier for you to educate your servers about the wines on the menu so they may in turn offer knowledgeable recommendations.

Be inclusive of the different categories of wine. For example, have two to three selections of dessert wine on the menu. Have at least one champagne that you can offer to customers celebrating a special occasion at your restaurant.

7.Hot Category wines.
Keep abreast of trending products and make sure these are included in your wine list (especially if you have a comprehensive list).There is no good reason to exclude these popular products from your list. For a novice wine drinker, it will add a level of comfort to try a varietal that they are familiar with or have heard of. Even for a connoisseur, a good quality wine in a popular category will not be one to pass up on easily. If possible, also add some value wines to the menu. It will make the difference between a yay or nay for some of your customers.

8. Source and Price Correctly
Wines of certain varietals and from different regions have expected price points. Introducing an exorbitantly priced wine from an area that is known for low price points is not advisable. This will look out of place and may also cause the customer to mistrust your pricing and product selection.
If the menu is moderately priced, so should the wines. This goes hand in hand.
Don’t overprice wines compared to their selling price in retail or online stores. Today’s customer comes aware and researched and nobody wants to feel like they have been taken for.

9. Changing Table Cards
No longer are designing and printing costs so astronomical that one may not be able to change wine cards once they are printed and placed on the table. By using table stands where print inserts are changeable, these can be replaced periodically. There are simple design resources available online that small to medium sized restaurant owners can use to modify wine cards from time to time. Make use of these to highlight new or seasonal products. People who frequent your restaurant will appreciate the change as these small touches keep the experience of visiting your restaurant fresh and interesting for them.

Meet Importers, State Distributors, Retailers and Press of USA in New York City and Grow Your Distribution.

Event Producer: Beverage Trade Network

USA Trade Tasting is brought to you by Beverage Trade Network, the leading online platform dedicated to connecting the global beverage industry. Beverage Trade Network (BTN) successfully connects wineries, breweries, distilleries and brand owners with international importers, distributors, brokers and beverage industry professionals on a daily basis. Strong partnerships with international and US organizations have helped BTN establish USA Trade Tasting as a premiere sales and marketing event committed to connecting the beverage industry.

2018 Exhibitor Super Early Bird Registration Is Now Open. Secure Your Best Price Now And Grow In Us Market.